Reverse Osmosis Water Filters

Sale!
Out of stock

Reverse Osmosis Water Filters

AWF400 Tankless Reverse Osmosis Water Filter

$1,200.00 $875.00
Sale!
Out of stock

Reverse Osmosis Water Filters

AWF500 Tankless Reverse Osmosis Water Filter

$1,400.00 $995.00

Purified Water

Reverse Osmosis is the most convenient and effective method of water filtration. Pressurized water is passed through different stages of filtration before reaching a semi-permeable membrane, which is rated at 0.0001 Micron.

Reverse Osmosis is the technology used to make bottled water, it is also the only technology capable of desalinating sea water and making it drinkable.

Typically other water filtration methods aren’t nearly as efficient or effective as Reverse Osmosis. For example non reverse osmosis water filters typically use a single activated carbon cartridge to treat water. The pore size on these filters are much bigger, generally 0.5 – 10 micron, making it capable of filtering coarse particles, sediments and larger micron rated elements. However, most dissolved substances cannot be filtered out as they are much finer then the filtration media used in typical water filters. As a result, water is far less clean and safe compared to reverse osmosis filtration.

Purified water is the safest and healthiest option for you and your family.

Family Drinking Filtered Water

How Reverse Osmosis Filters Work

Reverse osmosis is used to improve the taste, safety, and overall quality of drinking water. The filter system uses an extensive and detailed process to effectively remove over 2000+ contaminants from the water it is filtering. The filtration process is the gradual sequence of larger to smaller micron filtration, this can be broken up into 3 steps.

1. Pre-Filtration

Before the water can go through the reverse osmosis process, it must be pre-filtered. Pre-filtration is used to remove some of the larger water contaminants and sediment so the thin reverse osmosis membrane does not get damaged. It removes larger sediments, dissolved solids, and reduces chlorine. The pre-filtration step will usually have a sediment filter and a form of carbon filtration such as a carbon block or granular activated carbon filter.

2. Reverse Osmosis Membrane

Once the water has passed through the pre-filtration stage it will reach the reverse osmosis membrane. This is when the reverse osmosis process occurs, the water is forced through a semi-permeable membrane with pressure greater than 40psi. This membrane will let water molecules pass through, but will catch almost everything else in the water to 0.0001 micron. 

3. Post-Filtration 

Finally, the water must go through a remineralization process to add the magnesium and calcium found naturally in water. This is achieved with a post-filter that contains some form of calcium or magnesium. The most common substances used are Calcite (calcium carbonate) and Corosex (a magnesium compound). Some filters use a combination of both. The reverse osmosis treated water is passed through one of these filters where it dissolves some of the filtration media immediately before being dispensed. Calcite remineralizers will bring the pH to neutral (about 7.0) while Corosex will bring the pH above 7.

Reverse Osmosis Filtering Diagram

Dangers of Fluoride in our water

Water fluoridation is the practice of adding industrial-grade fluoride chemicals to water for the purpose of preventing tooth decay. However, most developed nations including Japan and over 95% of Western Europe, do not add fluoride to their water.

Drinking fluoridated water has no benefits

The whole basis of fluoride protecting our teeth from decay is based on topical treatments such as toothpaste. There is absolutely no benefit in swallowing fluoridated water, as a matter of fact it only causes harm.

Accumulation of fluoride in the body

According to studies, healthy adult kidneys excrete 50 to 60% of the fluoride ingested each day. The remainder accumulates in the body, largely in calcifying tissues such as the bones and pineal gland. Infants and children excrete less fluoride from their kidneys and absorb up to 80% of ingested fluoride into their bones. The effects of fluoride accumulating in the body can lead to many different.

Fluoridated Water vs Non Fluoridated Water

Fluoride advocates often claim that the reduction in tooth decay that has occurred since the 1950s is the result of the widespread introduction of fluoridated water. This is simply not true, rates have declined in all western countries, irrespective of whether the country ever fluoridated its water. Most western countries do not fluoridate their water and yet their tooth decay rates have declined at the same rate as fluoridated countries. This is demonstrated by examining the World Health Organization’s (WHO) data on tooth decay trends in each country.

Tooth Decay Trend Graph

Unnatural addition to our water supply

Despite the false claims by dental associations and governmental sources that water fluoridation is somehow beneficial for dental health, no valid proof exists that this is true. The facts are that the chemicals that are added into our water supplies as “water fluoridation” are highly toxic to us, especially so to children.

The compounds most used in “fluoridating” municipal water are Sodium Silicofluoride, (H3O) 2SiF6, and Hexafluorosilicic acid, Na2[SiF6], or sodium fluoride, (NaF). These are highly toxic compounds. Major scientific studies from around the world, have statistical evidence that fluoride exposure lowers IQ in children.

How Reverse Osmosis Filters remove Fluoride

The main component of a reverse osmosis filter system is the membrane. Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes have the smallest pores of all filters. Using pressure to drive the process, this pressure reverses the natural osmotic pressure and drives water through the membrane and away from dissolved molecules of contaminants. Our RO membranes can remove compounds to 0.0001 micron, which is thousands of times smaller than a human hair.

The effectiveness of reverse osmosis to filter toxic fluoride from water depends on its ability at preventing fluoride molecules from passing through its microscopic pores. RO filters are manufactured to precision tolerances, but the size of the pores in the filter are what ultimately determine what can physically pass through it. The size of the fluoride molecules are generally too large to pass through the smaller pores of the RO filter.

Although it plays a much less of a role, another factor in a contaminants ability to penetrate the RO filter is ionic diffusion. That is, to diffuse through an RO membrane, the negatively-charged fluoride ion must become associated with, or dissolved into, at least one component of that membrane.

The advanced materials used in our RO membranes do not allow fluoride compounds to bond with the atoms and molecules that make up the membrane, preventing them from passing through it in this manner.

Purified Water

Reverse Osmosis is the most convenient and effective method of water filtration. Pressurized water is passed through different stages of filtration before reaching a semi-permeable membrane, which is rated at 0.0001 Micron.

Reverse Osmosis is the technology used to make bottled water, it is also the only technology capable of desalinating sea water and making it drinkable.

Typically other water filtration methods aren’t nearly as efficient or effective as Reverse Osmosis. For example non reverse osmosis water filters typically use a single activated carbon cartridge to treat water. The pore size on these filters are much bigger, generally 0.5 – 10 micron, making it capable of filtering coarse particles, sediments and larger micron rated elements. However, most dissolved substances cannot be filtered out as they are much finer then the filtration media used in typical water filters. As a result, water is far less clean and safe compared to reverse osmosis filtration.

Purified water is the safest and healthiest option for you and your family.

Family Drinking Filtered Water

How Reverse Osmosis Filters Work

Reverse osmosis is used to improve the taste, safety, and overall quality of drinking water. The filter system uses an extensive and detailed process to effectively remove over 2000+ contaminants from the water it is filtering. The filtration process is the gradual sequence of larger to smaller micron filtration, this can be broken up into 3 steps.

1. Pre-Filtration

Before the water can go through the reverse osmosis process, it must be pre-filtered. Pre-filtration is used to remove some of the larger water contaminants and sediment so the thin reverse osmosis membrane does not get damaged. It removes larger sediments, dissolved solids, and reduces chlorine. The pre-filtration step will usually have a sediment filter and a form of carbon filtration such as a carbon block or granular activated carbon filter.

2. Reverse Osmosis Membrane

Once the water has passed through the pre-filtration stage it will reach the reverse osmosis membrane. This is when the reverse osmosis process occurs, the water is forced through a semi-permeable membrane with pressure greater than 40psi. This membrane will let water molecules pass through, but will catch almost everything else in the water to 0.0001 micron. 

3. Post-Filtration 

Finally, the water must go through a remineralization process to add the magnesium and calcium found naturally in water. This is achieved with a post-filter that contains some form of calcium or magnesium. The most common substances used are Calcite (calcium carbonate) and Corosex (a magnesium compound). Some filters use a combination of both. The reverse osmosis treated water is passed through one of these filters where it dissolves some of the filtration media immediately before being dispensed. Calcite remineralizers will bring the pH to neutral (about 7.0) while Corosex will bring the pH above 7.

Reverse Osmosis Filtering Diagram

Dangers of Fluoride in our water

Water fluoridation is the practice of adding industrial-grade fluoride chemicals to water for the purpose of preventing tooth decay. However, most developed nations including Japan and over 95% of Western Europe, do not add fluoride to their water.

Drinking fluoridated water has no benefits

The whole basis of fluoride protecting our teeth from decay is based on topical treatments such as toothpaste. There is absolutely no benefit in swallowing fluoridated water, as a matter of fact it only causes harm.

Accumulation of fluoride in the body

According to studies, healthy adult kidneys excrete 50 to 60% of the fluoride ingested each day. The remainder accumulates in the body, largely in calcifying tissues such as the bones and pineal gland. Infants and children excrete less fluoride from their kidneys and absorb up to 80% of ingested fluoride into their bones. The effects of fluoride accumulating in the body can lead to many different.

Fluoridated Water vs Non Fluoridated Water

Fluoride advocates often claim that the reduction in tooth decay that has occurred since the 1950s is the result of the widespread introduction of fluoridated water. This is simply not true, rates have declined in all western countries, irrespective of whether the country ever fluoridated its water. Most western countries do not fluoridate their water and yet their tooth decay rates have declined at the same rate as fluoridated countries. This is demonstrated by examining the World Health Organization’s (WHO) data on tooth decay trends in each country.

Tooth Decay Trend Graph

Unnatural addition to our water supply

Despite the false claims by dental associations and governmental sources that water fluoridation is somehow beneficial for dental health, no valid proof exists that this is true. The facts are that the chemicals that are added into our water supplies as “water fluoridation” are highly toxic to us, especially so to children.

The compounds most used in “fluoridating” municipal water are Sodium Silicofluoride, (H3O) 2SiF6, and Hexafluorosilicic acid, Na2[SiF6], or sodium fluoride, (NaF). These are highly toxic compounds. Major scientific studies from around the world, have statistical evidence that fluoride exposure lowers IQ in children.

How Reverse Osmosis Filters remove Fluoride

The main component of a reverse osmosis filter system is the membrane. Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes have the smallest pores of all filters. Using pressure to drive the process, this pressure reverses the natural osmotic pressure and drives water through the membrane and away from dissolved molecules of contaminants. Our RO membranes can remove compounds to 0.0001 micron, which is thousands of times smaller than a human hair.

The effectiveness of reverse osmosis to filter toxic fluoride from water depends on its ability at preventing fluoride molecules from passing through its microscopic pores. RO filters are manufactured to precision tolerances, but the size of the pores in the filter are what ultimately determine what can physically pass through it. The size of the fluoride molecules are generally too large to pass through the smaller pores of the RO filter.

Although it plays a much less of a role, another factor in a contaminants ability to penetrate the RO filter is ionic diffusion. That is, to diffuse through an RO membrane, the negatively-charged fluoride ion must become associated with, or dissolved into, at least one component of that membrane.

The advanced materials used in our RO membranes do not allow fluoride compounds to bond with the atoms and molecules that make up the membrane, preventing them from passing through it in this manner.